[Tig] some things to consider when designing a timing environs

Dave Pickett pickettscharge at hotmail.com
Sun Jan 30 07:41:32 GMT 2011


I had a recent, enjoyable eye exam in Atlanta.  Tested my left, right and stereo vision myriad ways. A peripheral vision test as well as the age old "decreasing letter size" test both straight up as well as with different lenses.  One could argue that this environment is more critical than a grading suite.  And they had not a single eyewash, 6500 K source, D65 etc while an Optometrist measures your eyes scientific range, including lens curvature, peripheral vision, optical nerve health etc.  

Being able to grade a clip in multiple environments is the trick.  Having that grade play out on the air as you wanted is the goal.  Being able to do so in multiple environments has helped me make a living.  Having a laboratory environment with absolute control while making the clients happy is not common.  Many like to advertise a true calibrated/integrated room but with display monitors in flux there is not a singularity, I guess except our eyes.  

Lou speaks of some fundamental truths.  We know most of the science involved in creating a grading environment.  However the practice far outweighs the theory in this case. 


Dave

Dave Pickett
Colorist
Jam Edit - Atlanta  






> From: rob at colorist.org
> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 22:15:15 -0800
> To: tig at colorist.org
> Subject: Re: [Tig] some things to consider when designing a timing environs
> 
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> 
> 
> On Jan 29, 2011, at 10:54 AM, Lou Levinson wrote:
> 
> >           also note that some of this will be inapplicable to a theater design as i doubt you'd          get a useful contrast ratio on a projection screen with a grey surround.
> 
> That's been something I've tried to resolve: what do you do for a neutral reference when dealing with 14 fl on a projection screen?  There are little tricks a colorist can use born of experience: the UI monitor, if trusted; a certain section of the console, if indeed at D65, etc.
> 
> >           for future considerations, ampas, especially with IIF/Aces seems to be moving          towards d60 white. this would work fine in the environs we're talking about even          if you did it now. the important part is the "d" for daylight.
> 
> d60, I think I could accomodate this fairly easily.  In fact, the lamps we bought recently for behind-monitor illumination didn't come in d65, so we settled for d60, but I'm mixing them with another lamp and the PhotoResearch probe returns something close to d65 with both up full, and with dimming on both sources, I can pretty much control for different monitor nit levels.
> 
> >          an impromptu poll: how many colorists out here see the dci white point as          actually being white??
> 
> (incidentally: we could set  this up as a formal poll on the TIG wiki)
> 
> DCI white point = x0.314, y0.351  or close to 5500K, is that correct (2 interlocking assumptions there)?
> 
> My personal opinion is that it's so environmentally dependent that for example, in a theatre with low screen illumination, I accept it as white given a few moments (arrive at the theatre for those all-important trivia quizzes 10 minutes before start).   If for monitor viewing, in the average home, maybe the increase toward cold (6500K for example) makes up for some ambient illumination warmth.    I'm not sure.   
> 
> Rob
> --
> Rob Lingelbach       Colorist, Dolby Laboratories, Los Angeles
> rob at colorist.org     http://rob.colorist.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
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