[Tig] Weird 16mm black/white neg 7222 problem

Carl Skaff carl at stopp.se
Sat Nov 3 23:18:32 GMT 2012


I've gotta one replies and wanted to add more info on the issue.

We thought it was due to residue from one of the baths. But it wasn't.

I have the same effect on the entire project. 7 camera rolls of 16mm.
In the lab it was devised into 3 different mags. 3 rolls + 2 rolls + 2
rolls.
Then spliced together to end up as 2 Labrolls (4rolls + 3rolls)
Then cleaned in a alcohol based filmcleaner (not a ultrasonic cleaner)
Then scanned in a Scanity in 2K.

Some scenes has more and some less 'problem'. But that could very likely be
due to it is more visible in dark scenes.
I could probably claim it is more on the left side of the image (perf-side)
but it is also on the right side, maybe less.


After we say the problem we thought it was due to residue from the last
rinsing bath that was stuck on the film.
So we emptied that bath and cleaned the tank and fills it up with a new
batch.
Then loaded 16mm leader in the developer and then spliced the labroll to
the leader (skipping all the nasty baths like developer/fix/stop/bleach/etc
and just had it go down to the last part.
That way we would have wetted the neg enough to loosen any dirt, and after
that it went into the dryer.

After that we checked it in the Scanity (same problem).
Then we cleaned it (still same problem)

So that pretty much concluded that it is not possible to remove by wetting
it, and it is most likely not caused by the cleaner. (If it would have been
ok after the 'bath/dry' but not after the cleaner then it would have
pointed to the cleaner)

We have checked (and will check more) with a microscope but can't find
anything on the film.

I compared the 2K scan from the first scanning to the result after it was
'bath/dry'+ cleaned... And the artifact are identical in the two scans.
I was thinking (or hoping)that there was some static discharge happening on
the film as it passed my scanner-gate. But that's not possible sine two
scans get the exact same fault. And static discharge sparks just couldn't
be that precise.


I think it was shot using a Arri 416.

This films WASN'T developed in the 'correct' Lab process. We only have a
'neg-machine'.
But the labguy has about 200 years of experience. And says that is
basically the same, just need to skip some baths (like bleach) and adjust
the speed for the asa to get the right time for the developer... And we've
done it many tunes before without these artifacts.

So, that's all the background info I can give. If anyone can figure out the
cause... I'll buy you a beer next time I see you :)
(Or two, if the cause is proven not to be from the lab:)


On the good side of things...
The director came in to check the fault and he said
'Oh, is that the fault?... It looks beautiful! That's the effect I want!!!'

The final look will probably bee like an old silent movie... So at least it
wasn't an billion dollar car-commercial that got this.
But nevertheless I still would need to find that cause of this.

If or when I do so... I'll let you all know.




TiG... What would we do without it!?

/Carl












(Sent from mobile device)
____________________________
*Carl Skaff*
*Colorist*
Stopp Stockholm
Office +46 8 50 70 35 00

*Stockholm | Los Angeles | Linz*
www.stopp.se

3 nov 2012 kl. 20:04 skrev Carl Skaff <carl at stopp.se>:

Hi all

I've got an issue that I'm hoping someone out there has stumbled across
before and knows what the cause could be.

My client shot 16mm B/W negative film, Kodak 7222.

The result has a weird problem. Kind of like small light speckles in the
image in an un-even way. First I thought they had some fake snow close to
the camera that gave this effect. But then they went inside and there
wasn't any fake-snow added. But the effect was still there.

We have checked the lab and nothing seems wrong. We did another job before
that was ok, but that was normal color neg.
we can't find anything physical ON the film.

I have a feeling that it might be that the film built up some static
electricity either in the camera or darkroom that caused tiny spark that
exposed the film. I don't know. Maybe a far fetched answer.

Anyone out there seen something like this before? Is so, please reply.

Here is a link that shows a screen capture of a fault frame and me circling
with the cursor to show where to look. And then stepping a frame
before/after to show the effect.





http://webftp.stopp.se/_aa84dG_yKeDW8R





/Carl





(Sent from mobile device)
____________________________
*Carl Skaff*
*Colorist*
Stopp Stockholm
Office +46 8 50 70 35 00

*Stockholm | Los Angeles | Linz*
www.stopp.se


More information about the Tig mailing list