[Tig] 8bit converted to 10bit, better?

Felix Trolldenier felix at trollfilm.de
Tue May 28 05:24:55 BST 2013


Dear all,

in post #16 you can find an almost mathematical proof:
http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/311394-Increasing-color-depth-and-sampling-for-color-correction

best,

Felix

TROLLFILM

www.trollfilm.de <http://www.trollfilm.de> . 030/98361160 . Boxhagener 
Str. 117 . 10245 Berlin


On 28.05.2013 04:37, Sam Daley wrote:
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> =====
>
>
> David,
>
> A few years ago I graded one of the first features shot on the Canon 7D -- Tiny Furniture. At that time, there were no established workflows for cutting and mastering from the camera's native H.264 files. In pre-production testing, we tried creating a native workflow but the results looked abysmal. One of our Technical Assistants at Technicolor had the idea to convert the H.264 files to 10 bit uncompressed quicktimes and it made a world of difference. With the 10 bit files, I was able to pull clean keys on a DaVinci 2K Plus.
>
> Though it was contrary to conventional thought, converting the native files was critical to the workflow for Tiny Furniture.
>
> Sam Daley
> Colorist
> Technicolor - Postworks NY
>
> On May 27, 2013, at 9:37 PM, "David Lindberg"<david.hj.lindberg at gmail.com>  wrote:
>
>> What conclusion can we get from the fact that the converted file actually looks better than the native, untouched file
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> http://tig.colorist.org/wiki3





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