[Tig] Film frame stabilization software

Jeff Kreines jeff at kinetta.com
Wed Nov 16 19:56:26 GMT 2016


Andreas:

We used to use Resolve for stabilization, which, as others commented, was a pain because it requires splitting shots up before use, and also can over-react to camera movement if you aren’t careful.

Instead of using post-stabilization, we completely redesigned the Kinetta Archival Scanner’s realtime stabilization during scanning — it can deal with long stretches of missing perfs and other film damage like shrinkage (no sprockets).  We always overscan, so if there are problems that cause a jump (usually for just a frame, and not very often) it can be dealt with in Resolve with a keyframe.

Not to turn into an ad, but our stabilization permits the user to select vertical stabilization only or horizontal and vertical, referenced to the perf (and you can select which perf to use, depending on format).  With poorly perforated film (common in Super-8) the perfs can weave from left to right, and using the vertical edges of the perf will add instability.  Our gate has a long (6”) fixed edge guide and spring-loaded edge guides, so physical weave is not a problem.

It’s always better to solve the problem during scanning.

Of course, there also can be stabilization problems on the film itself — either from camera problems or printed in.  For that post-processing is needed, and Resolve is good as long as there aren’t a lot of pans in the shot!

Best wishes,

Jeff Kreines
Kinetta 


> On Nov 16, 2016, at 1:40 PM, Grace McKay via Tig <tig at colorist.org> wrote:
> 
> Sohonet www.sohonet.co.uk sponsors the TIG.
> =====
> 
> 
> here is another one for consideration.
> 
> https://www.prodad.com/Video-Stabilization-for-Professionals/Mercalli-V4-SAL--29795,l-us.html
> 
> it actually works pretty well across cuts, but sometimes gives inaccurate results for a few frames. One big downside, depending on your workflow. It will accept most file formats, but the highest quality output is a quicktime file with around 2:1 compression, so if you need a full uncompressed workflow, this won't work.
> 
> Our  workflow is to capture uncompressed from the Spirit, or our 8mm scanner, scene detect in Resolve, and output qt scenes as individual files. then use Mercalli to batch process the folder of scene clips. then back into Resolve or Premiere for finishing, and output to prores. It is a bulky workflow, but because the final output is usually prores, it doesn't hurt the final output quality.
> 
> Grace McKay
> Electric Pictures Telecine
> Spirit High Definition Motion Picture Telecine Scanning
> *ElectricPictures.tv*
> *949-838-0001*
> 
> On 11/16/2016 8:56 AM, Joseph Owens via Tig wrote:
>> Sohonet www.sohonet.co.uk sponsors the TIG.
>> =====
>> 
>> 
>> Over the years, I’ve encountered a number of stabilizers… I am tempted to include “MetaSpeed” as the first…
>> 
>> When branching away from pure correction work, the VFX package “SHAKE” presented a couple of processing nodes; a “Tracker”, “Match Move” and a “Smoothcam.” which of course had varying degrees of operability from a UI standpoint and outcome success.  What was great about it and remains a strength is that the degree of control over the result is huge. And it still works in 4K.  It has had that ability for over a decade… even if it smells vaguely of blackpowder and has to be muzzle-loaded.
>> 
>> The Smooth node, cannibalized by Apple is, in fact, the behaviour that is the motion stabilizer in Motion and Final Cut. “Simplified."
>> 
>> Next up, MochaPro.  Not a point tracker, but a planar analysis tool with abilities that cannot be summarized in 50 words or less.
>> 
>> Yes, there is the Stabilizer in Resolve.  There are also OFX plugins that feature tracking/stabilization, and the Boris (+soon-to-be-bridged Sapphire catalog) asset base is connected directly to Mocha in the OFX UI.
>> 
>> I guess it depends on what it is you are trying to settle down.  The gate? The perf?  Or the action within the scene? If you are on the perf, then, I guess it would be possible to draw a bounding box around the area of interest, matte out the moving image within the frame and let ‘er rip for the whole roll.  Scene changes obviously require boundaries if you are dealing with cut footage or scenes that have natural motion within them.
>> 
>> This reminds me of the SilkScan option that started appearing with URSA… different modes depending on whether the motion within a scene was camera- or subject-related.
>> 
>>> On Nov 16, 2016, at 3:06 AM, Peter White (EAFA) via Tig <tig at colorist.org> wrote:
>>> 
>>> I've been using Resolve for stabilisation with great success.
>> Joe Owens
>> Presto!Digital Colourgrade
>> 8412 118 Street
>> Edmonton, Alberta T6G1T3
>> +1 780 270-5831 (mobile: text or voice)
>> jpo at prestodigital.ca
>> http://www.prestodigitalcolourgrade.ca
>> 
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Jeff Kreines
Kinetta
jeff at kinetta.com
kinetta.com





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